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Other Virtualization

KVM Stands for Kernel Virtual Machine.  KVM is a virtualization technology built into the Linux Kernel based on QEMU (Quick Emulator).  QEMU allows for virtualizing hardware, all the way from a complete hardware stack to a single device.  KVM basically takes QEMU and allows it to use hardware extensions to achieve better performance.

In this article I will outline the steps it takes to get a two node KVM farm running using Open Filer for your storage and Fedora Core 14 for your KVM hosts.  By the end of this tutorial you should know how to install and configure KVM, create a virtual machine and perform a live migration between two hosts.

Throughout these instructions I will use gedit for the text editor.  you can of course use any text editor you are comfortable with.  For example, if you are doing this through SSH you will want to use vi or nano.

When you think of the beginning of Server Virtualization, companies like VMWare may come to mind. The thing you may not realize is Server Virtualization actually started back in the early 1960’s and was pioneered by companies like General Electric (GE), Bell Labs, and International Business Machines (IBM).

Disaster recovery can be a difficult thing to plan for.  You back up your systems; perhaps you replicate your data to an off-site facility;  maybe you even build all redundant systems.

After doing all of these things, what is your goal?  It is to get your systems back up and running after some sort of a disaster, such as your building burning down; or an electrical failure in your data center.

Below I have listed a few possible scenarios you may encounter.  In these scenarios I outline a few problems you may encounter, but from a Server Prospective.  The network recovery is for another article.

Virtual Box is a very simple virtual machine package which can be installed on Linux, Mac, Windows, and Solaris. It is open source, so you can compile it to run on other systems as well.

In this tutorial video I will cover how to install virtual box and install your first virtual machine. The process of creating the virtual machine is does not change much from operating system to Operating system. As long as you know how to install the OS (Example: Windows or Linux) then you too can create a Virtual Machine. In this case I will be creating an Ubuntu Linux virtual machine. Ubuntu version 10.10 has a new installer, so it looks a little different if you have used previous versions, but it is still fairly intuitive.

When selecting you hardware, there are many factors to consider; How many Virtual Machines do you want to run at a time? How busy will these Virtual Machines be? If you are getting ready to P2V a bunch of virtual machines, then you should use Perfmon (In a Windows Environment) to take a benchmark before proceeding.

When people talk about Virtualization, they are most of the time referring to either Machine Virtualization, or Application Virtualization.

When You Virtualize an application, you isolate the application to run it its own little world, sometimes called a Sand Box.  By doing this you can get around application compatibility issues, and simplify application deployment.

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