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VMWare

Sometimes virtual machines within your VMWare environment may show up as invalid. The machine is in-fact still running at this point; but you are unable to manage the virtual machine. This can handle for a few reasons, but in my experience the most common is when the esx host is unable to access the storage.

I have seen this caused by high latency when accessing an NFS datastore, when you leave an offline datastore mounted for an extended period, and I have also seen this happen when a SAN controller failover event occurs.

Today is the second day of VMWorld and we heard from from VMWare's old CEO Paul Maritz new CEO Pat Gelsinger on the direction the company is taking.    In the last four years we have seen server virtualization in the enterprise go from 25% penetration to approximately 60% penetration.  VMWare has an 80% marketshare in virtualization so this shows a huge growth for the company.  In the next four years VMWare would like to see 90% adoption of virtualization in the enterprise.

When you think of the beginning of Server Virtualization, companies like VMWare may come to mind. The thing you may not realize is Server Virtualization actually started back in the early 1960’s and was pioneered by companies like General Electric (GE), Bell Labs, and International Business Machines (IBM).

Disaster recovery can be a difficult thing to plan for.  You back up your systems; perhaps you replicate your data to an off-site facility;  maybe you even build all redundant systems.

After doing all of these things, what is your goal?  It is to get your systems back up and running after some sort of a disaster, such as your building burning down; or an electrical failure in your data center.

Below I have listed a few possible scenarios you may encounter.  In these scenarios I outline a few problems you may encounter, but from a Server Prospective.  The network recovery is for another article.

 

Disaster recovery can be a difficult thing to plan for.  You back up your systems; perhaps you replicate your data to an off-site facility;  maybe you even build all redundant systems.

After doing all of these things, what is your goal?  It is to get your systems back up and running after some sort of a disaster, such as your building burning down; or an electrical failure in your data center.

Below I have listed a few possible scenarios you may encounter.  In these scenarios I outline a few problems you may encounter, but from a Server Prospective.  The network recovery is for another article.

As you may have noticed there are a lot of virtualization products in the market.  Some of the better known products are from Parallels, Oracle, VMWare, and Microsoft.   Each company has products with different strengths and weaknesses.

When selecting you hardware, there are many factors to consider; How many Virtual Machines do you want to run at a time? How busy will these Virtual Machines be? If you are getting ready to P2V a bunch of virtual machines, then you should use Perfmon (In a Windows Environment) to take a benchmark before proceeding.

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